Greenland Review

Greenland movie posterSynopsis
When comet fragments begin crashing down to Earth, John Garrity (Gerard Butler) sets off on a journey with his family from their home in Georgia to bunkers in Greenland before the biggest of the fragments strikes the planet.

Review
For as much of a catastrophe that 2020 was, it’s quite appropriate that one of the final films released this year is a disaster movie. You would be forgiven if you go into Greenland expecting a cheesy adventure often seen within the genre. And while this film does contain some of the tropes expected from this sort of film, it does manage to find an authenticity not often found in disaster movies. This all stems from Gerard Butler and his every-man portrayal of John Garrity, who is merely a structural engineer trying to protect his family. He is not indestructible, nor does he become this insanely good fighter like is often seen. Rather, he simply uses his wits to protect his family. Greenland is surprisingly down to Earth, focusing on the family dynamic between John, his estranged wife Allison (Morena Baccarin), and their son Nathan (Roger Dale Floyd). While similar films have attempted this approach, Greenland manages to do it more successfully. Of course, it helps that Butler, Baccarin and Floyd all have great chemistry together. As the trio journey to from the southern United States to Greenland, they meet many different characters along the way. The movie uses this structure to display the different ways people would react and behave during such a calamity. It’s a powerful and effective way to examine human nature.

I thought Greenland was GOOD 🙂 Choosing to focus on humanity and family rather than the impending disaster, it manages to strike a surprising emotional cord for this type of film. This smaller focus does prevent some of the genre’s more obnoxious flaws from surfacing, however it doesn’t avoid them completely. Nonetheless, Greenland is one of the better disaster films out there and feels like a fitting end to the disaster that is 2020.

Trailer

Cast & Crew
Ric Roman Waugh – Director
Chris Sparling – Writer
David Buckley – Composer

Gerard Butler – John Garrity
Morena Baccarin – Allison Garrity
Roger Dale Floyd – Nathan Garrity
Scott Glenn – Dale

Deadpool Review

Deadpool movie posterSynopsis
When Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) gets diagnosed with terminal cancer, he agrees to undergo experimentation that would grant him super powers.

Review
I have been waiting to see Deadpool on screen for some time. It looked like we were going to get a good Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine, but think we all know how that turned out. We got a good Wade Wilson but their Deadpool was an abomination. He is one of my favorite comic characters and it hurt to see him treated in that way. But now, he finally has a proper movie. Does Deadpool deliver everything the character’s fans were hoping for? You bet your chimi-fucking-changas it does!

Much like Ryan Reynolds’ portrayal of Wade Wilson in X-Men Origins: Wolverine, he perfectly brings the character to life here again. He never shuts up, always cracking jokes, being a vulgar smart-ass, and constantly talks to the audience. Even his appearance, from his skin post-transformation and his costume are pulled straight from the comic book. Everything about Deadpool was on point. This was the truest adaptations of a comic character in a long time.

This is not your typical comic book movie. Some comic book movies will tone down the action and language to get a PG-13 rating. If Deadpool had tried that, this movie would have failed miserably. Deadpool is a character that deserves the R-rating. He is very foul-mouthed, over-the-top violent, and unrefined. To do anything less would have been a disservice to the character. If you are expecting a movie along the lines of Iron Man, go look elsewhere. When you watch Deadpool, expect a lot of blood, guts, exploding heads, dismemberment, and f-bombs.

As I’ve mentioned before, Reynolds did a fantastic job the first time as the character. He is even better the second time around, especially since he spends more than five minutes as Wade Wilson. I believe Deadpool would not have worked as well if anyone besides Reynolds was in the red spandex. Reynolds has both the comedic timing and action skills to pull off all aspects of the character.

It seems each new comic book movie is longer than the last. Deadpool clocks in at 108 minutes. As a result, it moves pretty fast. The studio knows what the audience wants to see, so there is no extra fluff. It starts off with a big action scene, then the back story is slowly sprinkled in. The number of characters is fairly small so there is nothing more than what is necessary. I almost wanted the movie to be longer! I was having so much fun that I didn’t want it to end.

I think my only gripe is that between the several trailers, much of the great moments from the bridge fight scene in the were spoiled. This scene on the bridge takes a good chunk of the movie so it was disappointing when the scene kept going and I felt like I had seen it already.

I thought Deadpool was GREAT :-D. Ryan Reynolds perfectly captures Deadpool, who is true to his comic book counterpart. The action is comically over-the-top and a quick run time keeps the movie focused. I knew I was in for a treat when the opening credits, before anyone even speaks, made me laugh.

Favorite Quote
It’s a big house. It’s weird that I only ever see two of you. Almost like the studio couldn’t afford another X-Man. -Deadpool

Trailer

Cast & Crew
Tim Miller – Director
Rhett Reese – Writer
Paul Wernick – Writer
Tom Holkenbog – Composer

Ryan Reynolds – Wade Wilson / Deadpool
Ed Skrein – Ajax
TJ Miller – Weasel
Morena Baccarin – Vanessa
Stefan Kapicic – Colossus (voice)
Brianna Hildebrand – Negasonic Teenage Warhead
Gina Carano – Angel Dust
Karen Soni – Dopinder
Leslie Uggams – Blind Al